Fire Trucks of the 1950s

Fire Trucks of the 1950s

36.95

ITEM 190TOT

WITH U.S. DELIVERY, THIS ITEM SHIPS USPS MEDIA MAIL

By Walter M.P. McCall

American motor fire apparatus design reached its highwater mark in the 1950s. Every one of the nation’s major fire apparatus manufacturers boasted uniquely individual custom fire truck designs. American LaFrance dominated the industry with its landmark cab-forward 700 Series, which morphed into the new-and-improved 800 series and all-new wide-cab 900. Seagrave introduced its siren-in-the-nose 70th Anniversary Series, augmented late in the decade by the company’s first belated cab-forward design. Mack replaced its classic L-Series conventional with the pleasingly-contoured new B Series.

Ahrens-Fox continued to offer its archaic front-mounted piston pumpers, and at mid-decade fielded its own sleek cab-forward pumper design. Crown Firecoach arrived on the scene in 1951; Pirsch, Maxim, and FWD successfully marketed their distinctive long-nosed conventionals; and Fords, Chevys, GMCs, Dodges, Internationals, REOs, Federals, and Diamond Ts were every bit as stylish as their custom-chassis counterparts. The most successful fire engine chassis of all time—Ford’s tilt-cab C Series—made its debut in 1957. For sheer variety and visual dazzle, this fondly-remembered decade has never been equaled, and it is all here in this long-overdue tribute to the fire trucks of the Fabulous Fifties!

Paperback, 128 pages

Quantity:
Add To Cart